Best in Class

A Global Leader

7‑Eleven is the world’s largest convenience retailer and is consistently ranked as a top-10 franchisor. Our brand is known and loved around the world and our iconic products are a big part of American culture. Although we’ve grown exponentially over the years, our focus stays fixed on making life easier for customers. We’re continuously inventing and rethinking ways to stay convenient in a busy, changing world.

Strength in Numbers

What started on an ice dock in 1927 has evolved into more than 69,000 stores in 17 countries. With 9,000 stores in the U.S., there’s plenty of opportunity to go around.

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Opening your first 7‑Eleven is easier than you think.

New to franchising? Or just 7‑Eleven? Learn what it takes to partner with our brand.

Dive In

The 7‑Eleven Story in Years

1927

The World's First

To make life a little easier on his customers, “Uncle Johnny” Jefferson Green has the bright idea to start selling everyday staples from the dock of a local icehouse in Dallas, Texas. The world’s first convenience store is born.

1933

Drinks for Everyone

Prohibition is repealed and the ice docks start selling beer and liquor, which dramatically impacts store growth.

1937

The Idea Spreads

Southland Ice Company President and Founder Joe C. Thompson Jr. takes Uncle Johnny’s idea to other local ice docks. Within a decade, locations selling the new product line triple in numbers. The new “convenience stops” are called Tote’m Stores

1946

A New Name

The name changes from Tote’m Stores to 7-Eleven to reflect the new extended hours – 7am to 11pm, seven days a week.

1950s

Beyond Texas

The one-stop shopping locations offer everything consumers need, including gas. New stores open in Florida, Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

1963

Driving in Cars

More and more people now own cars, which means the need for convenience is on the rise. 7-Eleven opens the 1,000th store – and counting.

1963

All Night Long

A 7-Eleven location near a university in Austin stays open all night to accommodate students. The 24/7 idea is a hit and soon catches on in other locations.

1964

Franchise This

7-Eleven enters the franchising business with the purchase of several Speedee Mart franchises in California.

1965

The Drink Revolution

It starts with the launch of the Slurpee® drink and the world’s first coffee to go.

1969

Crossing Borders

7-Eleven goes international and opens locations in Canada, bumping up the number of stores to 3,500.

1970s

The Self-Service Movement

7-Eleven leads the way, offering self-serve gas and the first self-serve soda fountain. Americans are also introduced to the Big Gulp® fountain drink.

1980s

World Traveler

7-Eleven continues opening new international locations, including stores in Australia, Sweden, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Guam, Malaysia and the Philippines.

1990s

Getting Healthy

7-Eleven starts shipping fresh food products daily to meet the needs of health-conscious consumers.

Present

No Signs of Stopping

With 60,000 stores – and counting – located around the globe, we’re more determined than ever to continue innovating and delivering “what the customers want, when and where they want it.”

We’re making franchising more accessible.

Convenience stores thrive in nearly every community in the U.S. So it’s no surprise that our brand’s success comes from the fact that our Franchisees represent all different types of communities and cultures.

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Our Leadership

Demonstrating customer obsession to be the world’s leader in convenience.

Joseph M. DePinto

Joseph M. DePinto

President and Chief Executive Officer

Chris Tanco

Chris Tanco

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

Stanley Reynolds

Stanley Reynolds

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Rankin Gasaway

Rankin Gasaway

Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer

Glenn Plumby

Glenn Plumby

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Speedway

Jack Stout

Jack Stout

Senior Vice President, Merchandising and Demand Chain

Ken Wakabayashi

Ken Wakabayashi

Senior Vice President, International

Marissa Henderson Jarratt

Marissa Henderson Jarratt

Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

Jesus Delgado-Jenkins

Jesus Delgado-Jenkins

Senior Vice President, Business Development and Chief Growth Officer

Holly Angell

Holly Angell

Senior Vice President of Construction, Engineering and Facilities

Sean Duffy

Sean Duffy

Senior Vice President, Fuels

Scott Hintz

Scott Hintz

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

Raj Kapoor

Raj Kapoor

Senior Vice President of Fresh Food and Proprietary Beverages

Lillian Kirstein

Lillian Kirstein

Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Secretary

Raghu Mahadevan

Raghu Mahadevan

Senior Vice President, Digital

Doug Rosencrans

Doug Rosencrans

Senior Vice President, Franchise Operations

Timothy Rupp

Timothy Rupp

Senior Vice President, Speedway Merchandising

Robert (Bobby) Schwerin

Robert (Bobby) Schwerin

Senior Vice President, Finance

Brad Williams

Brad Williams

Senior Vice President, Corporate Operations and Restaurants

Mani Suri

Mani Suri

Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer

Join Our Ranks

We know U.S. military veterans have the skills, focus and experience needed to succeed as business owners. That’s why we offer incentives like special discounts and financing.

Let’s Roll

Next: The Financials

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